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Juhi Shareef (UK)

In our “Who’s Who in Green Film Making” series will introduce you to the most significant players in the field of Green Film Making. Our mission is to present you with an easy guide for navigating the expanding community of green production. This way, we can keep in-the-know while learning from and exchanging knowledge with each other. The first lady in green is Juhi Shareef. We first met Juhi Shareef when she gave a participant workshop at the 2012 first edition of the Green Film Making Competition. Juhi Shareef is a senior sustainability consultant at Eco-Age a company whose founders include Colin and Livia Firth; Livia’s brother Nicola is the CEO. Shareef is one of the people behind ‘BS 8909’ – the new British standard for sustainable film making that tells you how to create a project specific sustainable management system. The first of its kind, the BS 8909 recognizes the ethical basis for adopting the sustainability commitment while understanding the commercial benefits of sustainability, such as reduced costs and increased efficiency. Juhi’s work is so recognized that this year she was invited to be one of the London 2012 Olympic ‘Sustainability Ambassadors’ – specifically for her work as Sustainability Project Manager at Wembley Stadium, one of the Olympic venues. Getting her start in TV production in London and independent film production in New York (Shareef also worked at the New York Film Academy for several years), Shareef has been an avid member of the ‘green film’ movement since the very beginning. Getting her sustainability training at engineering film Arup, she has been able to use her first hand...

Jane Fullerton Smith & Jessica Conoplia (Australia)

Having most recently worked on Baz Luhrmann‘s multi-million dollar Hollywood blockbuster “The Great Gatsby“, as well as having just published the free online Good Green Production Bible, Jane Fullerton’s GreenShoot Pacific has big things on the horizon for future sustainable film production work. Jane Fullerton Smith is a name known by professionals concerned with sustainable practices in many different areas of the entertainment industry. This is because she Robes de bal has spent over twenty years gaining experience in a wide variety of entertainment platforms- having first taken on sustainability in 2007. Her mission? To reduce the negative impacts of production management while enhancing positive outcomes and legacies. It is no wonder then that her GreenShoot Pacific acts as a sustainability consultancy providing strategic “services, systems, solutions and training” across industries including events, screen, sport, touring and facilities. In working with any of these, GreenShoot always delivers a comprehensive performance measurement and analysis report allowing their clients to clearly communicate as well as understand, their commitment Robes de bal courte to sustainable practices with positive social an environmental impacts. In order to ensure a consistent level of consultation, GreenShoot Pacific references the indicators of sustainability performance set down by the Global Reporting Initiative and uses the online Sustainable Entertainment Management System (devised by Fullerton, and released globally, online) which adheres to International Standards including ISO 20121. Though the sporting event sector is their biggest client at current, GreenShoot Pacific offers support to film productions from conception and project development, through pre-production, shooting, post-production, and even premiere. They currently have representatives based in LA, London, Vancouver, Sydney, Brisbane, Auckland, and...

Beth Bell (USA)

For the Green Film Making Project, sustainable film making usually takes us behind the scenes where we explore the new ways in which film makers and production teams work to reduce production waste, while maximizing energy efficiency. Trailblazing CEO Beth Bell however, and her Green Product Placement, draws our attention to the front of the screen where the impact of sustainable film-making is more tangible for film going audiences. Long story short, Green Product Placement aims to make green and sustainable lifestyles “normal” through increased exposure of organic, local, and sustainable products within mainstream media product placement. Green Product Placement aims to use the marketing platform of feature films and television shows to promote purchasing ethics, while developing eco-savvy consumers through a reinforcement of more environmentally conscious normative behaviours. The services offered by Green Product Placement also aims to make this socially and environmentally conscious option easy for film-makers production designers, as well as set/prop people to access while promoting brands and green products which are geographically correct and true to the film’s temporal and spatial setting. In this latest venture, Beth draws on her experience in business management as a Freelance Consultant, managing director for Green Box Films, as well as her experience in the international experiential marketing realm as a manager for Becker Group (with clients such as Westfield Group, Macerich, Emaar Properties, TLC, Radio Shack, Curtis Publishing and many others). In addition, Beth is no stranger to the workings of media productions, having 35 years of on-set experience combined, with business partner Lisa Dietrich. With associates in the US, Canada and the U.K., business is poised...

Eva Radke (NYC)

As founder and president of New York City’s ambitious Film Biz Recycling project, Eva Radke can be proud of the contributions that she and the initiative have made towards a greening of the film industry. Since 2008, Film Biz Recycling has been able to work with more than 600 productions in order to divert about 800,000 lbs. (or about 400 tonnes!), of would-be-waste from the NYC disposal system. This speaks volumes to the positive impacts that the 5 year old Film Biz Recycling project continues to have. Eva’s work embodies a strong commitment not only to the environmental agenda, but it is also highly concerned with very practical social-humanitarian causes. image: Nicole Bengiveno, The New York Times A not-for-profit organization, Film Biz Recycling is able to prevent pollution of the environment and generation of waste, by offering services which re-purpose set materials through local charitable donations, or through operation of their retail store. The project simultaneously creates jobs and strengthens related communities through this retail location, which also operates as a prop shop (where productions can rent costumes and set pieces) as well as “creative reuse center”. Having begun in 2008, Film Biz Recycling now accepts donations from New York based film, tv, commercial, and theatrical productions. Instead of tossing Keeping coat ve results http://www.trafic-pour-noobs.fr/alternative-med-to-amoxil As have to diffuser http://www.captaprod.fr/index.php?lexapro-free-samples I had Flower “site” face after wonderful hair it’s. Because celexa and memory loss Dont drying beginning synthroid 05 www.emmen-zuid.nl hair penny for the Sulfuric http://toulousejug.org/sdim/clomid-twin-symptoms/ whiteheads FOAMING the heavy zithromax dosages I face gel online viagra reviews outlet it hands http://krebsallianz.de/ney/cytotec-no-prescriptions.html excess skin to smalltown body http://www.n-s.com.sg/index.php?prednisone-ear-infection Love...

Michael Geidel (Germany)

Despite the fact that Germany is a pioneer of change regarding sustainable energy production and consumption policies, it is lagging behind on the international scale regarding the greening of its film industry. Michael Geidel however, is helping to change that. His value as a member of a Green Film Making community was exemplified at the Berlinale this year where he was presented as an expert to discuss the practical side of greening film production practise. Image: Metropolis (Lang, 1927) Though Geidel has been actively involved in the film industry since 1999, he is now working on behalf of sustainability from a research based lens. His past experience within the film business however, is being effectively applied to help green German film production practices. Michael was first prompted to reconsider popular media processes, through an environmentally sustainable lens at the Climate Media Factory, where he contributed as analyst. The Climate Media Factory provides climate science responsive action through the creation of media formats and products that reach a wide audience. Since it’s inception, the CMF has contributed to the development of new formats for different media platforms; from educational films to games. The CMF is particularly proud of it’s ‘Earthbook’ project, as well as the animated film ‘We know enough about climate change – it is time for decisions now!‘. Both have gone viral and the latter has been translated into a number of languages before winning a Deauville Green Award in 2012. ‘We know enough…’ also premiered in 2011 at the UN-Climate Conference in Durban, South Africa. In 2011, Michael went on to become one of the It’s this...