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Second season of Killing Eve partly shot in Amsterdam

The second season of the successful British series Killing Eve was partially shot in the capital last September, including scenes at the Rijksmuseum and the Red Light District. Killing Eve is about a security officer who tracks down a serial killer and is created by Phoebe Waller-Bridge, also known for the popular series Fleabag. The lead roles are played by Sandra Oh and Jodie Comer and this season there is a supporting role for Dutch actor Roeland Fernhout. The Dutch part of the production was in the hands of Topkapi Films, who try to run every production as sustainable as possible. No exception here. Production manager Chrissy van der Linden explains: The English crew had already received and was using resuable water bottles and so we also gave the Dutch crew a bottle as a crew gift. We asked the extras to bring their own water bottles and use them. Our caterer Suus en Binkie made sure that there were water tanks on the set, so that everyone could refill their bottles easily. We didn’t use a single plastic water bottle or disposable cup. Furthermore, we limited the printing of scripts and schedules as much as possible. Everything was sent digitally and also supposed to be viewed digitally via Dropbox. Because we only shot in the center of Amsterdam, we asked our crew to come by bike. Nobody could or was even able to come by car. For the extras there was a special shuttle from a parking lot outside the city center. Location manager Thijs Bolle adds: The crew really did their best to separate waste. We had...

If the shoe fits …: which clothing lines are really sustainable?

Photo: Fabrice Monteiro, from the series The Prophecy Every production faces this question, from the evening news to a period drama: how do you dress the talent in front of the camera in a sustainable way? We researched the state of affairs at various costume departments last year (report in Dutch). And this showed that renting, storing for reuse and buying second-hand made the sector already considerably sustainable. Renting is, of course, a form of reuse. Many special costumes are stored and reused and clothing is bought second-hand or even used from personal wardrobes because of limited budgets. But there obviously are situations where new items are purchased or custom made. Lead actors, for example, often have to wear a tailor-made costume of good quality. In these cases it is still difficult to know whether the entire supply chain of a garment is sustainable. And there is too little knowledge about which fabrics have been manufactured sustainably and which are absolutely not. So we rummaged in the back of the closet again and wondered: is it possible to work more sustainably in the fashion industry? What if you do not have the time to mill around flea markets or second-hand shops and have no space for storage? And which stores offer the most sustainable collections if you have to buy new? No Frills: A new sustainable fashion line The clothing industry is one of the most polluting industries in the world. Most clothing is still made from materials that are not sustainably produced. The manufacturing process can also be much improved; the use of toxic chemicals as well as plastic packaging, massive...