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Focus on Green 2016

On October 4th 2016 the ‘Focus on Green 2016’ congres took place, initiated from the Mediapark in Hilversum where most Dutch broadcasters are based. One of the central questions was, how we can make sure that the media goes along with the need to become more ecologically sustainable. The host of the day, Jan Douwe Kroeske, took the lead: ‘ Amongst other things by sharing stories and inspiring each other. And also by letting yourself be inspired. These are fundamentals of our profession.  Both Dutch (for example Gijs Kerbosch, Paul Römer, Bernice Notenboom and Peter Smit) and international guests (like Andy Ridley and Aaron Matthews) took the stage. Andy Ridley, initiator of the successful Earth Hour went first. He currently works for the Amsterdam based non-profit Circle Economy. Ridley: “No other country is as far removed from the concept of circulair economy as The Netherlands. Television and film can play a crucial part in making the concept known. Share the stories, as much as you can. ” Someone who was very keen to share his story at the congres was film and TV producer Gijs Kerbosch of 100% HALAL. A 100% ecological success-story? Not so much, but especially for that reason an important story to be heard. When Kerbosch produced his first short for broadcaster NTR, it needed to be done as ecologically friendly as possible. And so it was. An extra employee was hired to ensure the sustainability on set. With Kerbosch’s next film it was the same story. After the second film 100% HALAL grew exponentially (from 4 to 22 employees). This growth had the effect of making the ‘green film...

Green Screen Day IDFA 2015

Green Screen Day 2015 26 November 2015 Location: Brakke Grond, Nes 45, Amsterdam 11u45 – 23u30   On 26 November 2015 Green Film Making will host, in collaboration with IDFA, another edition of its Green Screen Day. Five documentaries with a broadening view on social and sustainable issues were selected for screening; with introductions and Q&A’s by special guests. Green Film Making also invited architect and innovation specialist Thomas Rau for a special lecture: “Our being is temporary, the consequences are permanent.” Rau will analyse and discuss the steps we have to take to turn sustainability into durability and will present a model for a new economic system.   11.45 Salero With short introduction by Els Rientjes (Green Film Making) and Q&A with Marnix ten Kortenaar. Brakke Grond, Expozaal Film: Moises is one of the last ‘Saleros’. On the Salar de Uyuni, worlds’ largest salt plane, he runs a small salt business in the old ways of his forefathers. Underneath his feet, in the blinding white ground, something else is hiding that could elevate Bolivia’s poor population into relative wealth: lithium. Bolivia has 35% of the worlds recourses of lithium, the building block of most rechargeable batteries. It’s the Green Saudi Arabia. But, is the world’s need for a green solution to transport worth the destruction of this unique environment and the ancient way of life that lives on it?  Lithium for thought. Guest: Are those lithium batteries really such a good solution? Ex-professional ice skater Marnix ten Kortenaar, now better known for his company Dr Ten, develops batteries made of sea-salt. He doesn’t like the hype surrounding Tesla...

Industry ‘Shades of Green’ Panel at the Berlinale: Recap & Coverage

Policies on sustainability, and more sustainable practices, have already made their way as ‘norm’ across many pertinent and high emitting industries – think cars, energy supply, waste management. The film/TV industries however, have yet to enforce limits on their carbon emission outputs, despite the fact that these highly visible industries posses great social influence, and often rely on funding via pubic resources. That’s why at the Berlinale International Film Festival this year, representatives of several European Film Funds and green filmmaking initiatives sat down to discuss the film industry’s continued move towards more sustainable production practice. Yup, and it all went down at a panel entitled ‘Shades of Green’. [image: Bildschön] The panel, which was open to all Berlinale festival attending film professionals, was hosted by Green Film Shooting in cooperation with Filmförderung Hamburg Schleswig-Holstein (FFHSH) and asked the following questions: Do producers need direction from funding bodies to go green? Do the funding bodies need to apply sustainability stipulations to their resources? How can the existing international initiatives work together? What possibilities exist for a European guideline, and how can we ensure that co-productions are also going sustainable too?     It is clear that all over Europe, national green film/tv initiatives are moving forward. For example, the Filmförderung Hamburg Schleswig-Holstein has launched a new sustainable support measure for 2015: a film that receives funding from the FFHSH, can also apply to get the costs covered for an on-set green supervisor. In Holland, Els Rentjes (Sustainability Manager to the Dutch Film/TV industry) of The Netherlands Film Fund, is planning a series of trade specific workshops for this year. The workshops will work to educate...

Berlinale Panel Discussion ‘Shades of Green: Do we need rules to take responsibility?’

On Feb.7th in conjunction with the Berinale International Film Festival, there will be a hosted panel discussion on sustainability in media production, and you’re invited. Get all of the details here. [photo: behance.net] Panel Discussion – Shades of Green: Do we need rules to take responsibility? Sustainability is becoming an increasingly important issue in international Film/TV production. Glamorous green carpets are only one shade of it. Going green requires us to rethink routines and to break new ground in order to make an ecological impact. A lower carbon footprint indicates reduced energy consumption and it can be a real cost cutter. The key question: What does it take for productions to go green? Is it enough to conduct training workshops on sustainable methods and measures? Does the Film/TV industry need green incentives? Will productions implement green best practices only if guidelines require their carbon footprint before they receive full funding? Different approaches, models, and experiences used in various European countries will be discussed. Where & When February 7, 2015 – 2.30 – 4.00 p.m. Landesvertretung der Freien und Hansestadt Hamburg beim Bund Jägerstraße 1 – 3, 10117 Berlin (one subway stop from Potsdamer Platz/ U2 – Mohrenstraße) International Experts Present Siebe Dumon, Head of Training and Research, Flanders Audiovisual Fund, Belgium Joanna Gallardo Ecoprod Adviser – The-Ile-de-France Film Commission, France Eva Hubert, Executive Director, Filmförderung Hamburg Schleswig-Holstein (FFHSH), Germany Els Rientjes, Sustainability Manager, Netherlands Film Fund, Netherlands The workshop will be moderated by Birgit Heidsiek, Publisher/ Green Film Shooting. RSVP to dopp@ffhsh.de About Germany’s Green Film Shooting Green Film Shooting is an independent initiative launched by Publisher Birgit Heidsiek in 2012....

From ‘Greening the Screen’ (UK) to ‘Shades of Green’ at the upcomming Berlinale (DE); industry is buzzing with overwhelming talks of commitment to sustainable practise

Earlier in January, the BFI and BAFTA jointly presented the latest event in their annual Greening the Screen series. At the Jan 14th event, leading practitioners from both UK TV and Film, got together for an afternoon of panel discussions and presentations that showcased the current best practice for environmentally responsible production. The  event explored the ways in which the industry can lessen its negative impacts, while highlighting  the steps that film production professionals can currently take to support more sustainable practices. This is a much needed area of attention, as the film industry based in the UK annually emits 150,000 tonnes of CO2 from film production alone. The conversation that was started at the Greening the Screen event will be further continued next month at the Berlinale during Shades of Green – Do we need rules to take responsibility? a hosted panel discussion at the festival on Feb.7th. [image: Vrij Nederland] Greening the Screen in the UK with BAFTA and the BFI  To much success, the event was able to strengthen and solidify sustainability commitments from BAFTA, BFI, MU, Equity and other industry organisations, as well as the main UK studios. According to media sustainability consultants from Greenshoot -who are also working with the BFI on developing production sustainability case studies- what’s needed now, is support for sustainability from all on-set cast and crew: “when you sign film or TV deal memos, and contracts expecting the norm of a safe set, ask if the production can be run in a more sustainable way. If not, why not? Shouldn’t the protection of our beautiful living and breathing planet have the same due care as safety...

Recap: The Green Film Making Project hosts ‘Green Screen Day’ 2014 Success at the IDFA

On Thursday, Nov. 27th we hosted the 2nd annual ‘Green Screen Day’, for the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam, at the Brakke Grond in the city center. For the event, we presented special screenings for the top three documentaries – as selected by our team- from the festival’s ‘Green Screen’ program, & each provided an in-depth exploration on a different aspect of sustainability. The on-site experts & filmmakers who introduced the films, & who also held open Q&A sessions with audiences, contributed to make the screenings even more stimulating & inspiring. Because two of the three films screened sold out of tickets & also made it onto the IDFA’s Top 10 list of Audience Favourites, we can truly say that the day was a most engaging & green success! See photos of the day’s events right here .Continue to see the recap film of IDFA. [photos:Michael Vervuurt] Green Screen Day @ IDFA 2014 from greenfilmmaking on Vimeo. In addition to the central theme of ‘sustainability’, all three films told the stories of protagonists to whom ‘courage’ was a main feature of their character. In Good Things Await (Phie Ambo) protagonist Niels Stockholm exhibits his imovable courage in pursuing his own biodynamic approach to farming, in the face of encroaching opposition – a contention that could end up costing him his operational certifications. In Virunga (Orlando von Einsiedel), the rangers of Virunga National Park show an incredible example of bravery in remaining committed to the protection of the park’s natural habitat, as well as it’s endangered mountain gorillas; this is despite the looming civil war, and prospect of park occupation by violent rebel...