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AVROTROS recycles clothing and props

In the past 6 months Green Film Making continued with consulting Dutch broadcaster AVROTROS in making its in-house productions more sustainable. Last year, Els Rientjes already worked with the teams of the shows Tussen Kunst en Kitsch and Opsporing Verzocht. This season the work was more than doubled with a larger number of productions. At the children’s department she advised the crafts and cooking show Jill and the game shows Kaal of Kammen and Zappsport. Besides that, she also consulted popular shows Opgelicht, EenVandaag and Radar. Els: ‘It is really striking to me how fundamental AVROTROS’ commitment to sustainability is. The producers and story editors are all very aware which direction the broadcaster has taken.‘ The entire company now drinks from ceramic cups that are washed every day and are returned to all kitchen areas, clean and in crates. Espresso cups are the latest addition, so everyone can now drink their preferred type of coffee from matching glasses and cups. For meetings or errands at the nearby Mediapark you simply book a company bike and the company canteen is sufficiently stocked with healthy choices. Els spotted more and more people using their own water bottles that are refilled with tap water. For each of the consulted productions she provided the teams with multiple tips to be worked on. They range from recommendations for more sustainable energy and transport on set to extra attention for catering on shooting days and tips for sustainable clothing for the presenters. A great success has already been booked in the field of clothing last November. The basement of the AVROTROS building was bursting at the seems with...

Bags from film banners at Eye Filmmuseum and Vue; Upcycling at it’s best!

Everyone knows the store at Eye Filmmuseum as the ultimate place for film lovers. But besides that the popular store, in the top 10 of the world’s best museum shops, has an exclusive collection on offer, shop manager Marjan Vos also innovates with sustainability. She set up a system in which used film banners can be upcycled into unique bags. She developed the bags together with sustainable bag maker Marie-José Hamers, who is now being contacted left and right for new collaborations. Among others cinema company Vue Cinemas joined in. We talked to initiator Marjan, artisan Marie-José and Diederieke van Herwijnen of Vue Cinemas about this wonderful initiative. Marjan, where did you get the idea to do something with the old film banners? Marjan: Reuse is in my blood, I was raised like that. I think it is a shame to throw something away that is still fine and has been only used so briefly. I was at a Patti Smith concert once and there the guitarist shouted: ‘Support your locals!!’. This inspired me to focus on local artisans and not on China. I was just in the process of setting up the shop at Eye Filmmuseum, so the bags were a logical step for me. It went really fast, I was tipped to contact Marie-José when I was looking for good craftspeople around Amsterdam. Her first test model was immediately right. Folded from one piece and voilà, a wonderful shopper! Marie-José: The shopper eventually became a classic and from there on I designed other accessories. I can cut two bags from one banner and from the leftovers I...

Second season of Killing Eve partly shot in Amsterdam

The second season of the successful British series Killing Eve was partially shot in the capital last September, including scenes at the Rijksmuseum and the Red Light District. Killing Eve is about a security officer who tracks down a serial killer and is created by Phoebe Waller-Bridge, also known for the popular series Fleabag. The lead roles are played by Sandra Oh and Jodie Comer and this season there is a supporting role for Dutch actor Roeland Fernhout. The Dutch part of the production was in the hands of Topkapi Films, who try to run every production as sustainable as possible. No exception here. Production manager Chrissy van der Linden explains: The English crew had already received and was using resuable water bottles and so we also gave the Dutch crew a bottle as a crew gift. We asked the extras to bring their own water bottles and use them. Our caterer Suus en Binkie made sure that there were water tanks on the set, so that everyone could refill their bottles easily. We didn’t use a single plastic water bottle or disposable cup. Furthermore, we limited the printing of scripts and schedules as much as possible. Everything was sent digitally and also supposed to be viewed digitally via Dropbox. Because we only shot in the center of Amsterdam, we asked our crew to come by bike. Nobody could or was even able to come by car. For the extras there was a special shuttle from a parking lot outside the city center. Location manager Thijs Bolle adds: The crew really did their best to separate waste. We had...

Filming in a nature reserve: Zomer Zonder Mama and Redbad

photo above: Martijn van der Vaart Photography What do the productions Zomer Zonder Mama (Summer Without Mom) and Redbad have in common? Besides that they both shot on location in a protected nature reserve, they also had the same location manager: Willem Doorman. Willem has been trying to introduce sustainable solutions on set for years. For example he often uses electric gators for transport, as can be seen in this video report on Prooi by Dick Maas. Ofcourse a nature reserve requires extra care in terms of environmental impact: Zomer Zonder Mama shot scenes in a shifting sand area in the province of Utrecht and Redbad, among others, in De Alde Feanen National Park in Friesland. A great opportunity to take a closer look again at how our local Dutch productions introduce sustainable measures on location. Zomer Zonder Mama: Plowing through drift sand Telefilm Zomer Zonder Mama, directed by Sanne Vogel, is a Joco Media production. The film is about 10-year-old Suzan who during a summer vacation at her grandmothers’ makes friends with a girl the same age; Rana. Rana is a refugee from a nearby refugee camp. This summer had two weeks of shooting for this production in the Soesterduinen, Utrechtse Heuvelrug region. As the largest and last place in the Netherlands where sand can still drift freely, the area is protected by the province of Utrecht as a geological monument. The reason why the team wanted to shoot there specifically was because of a scene around a tree house near a refugee camp where the tents and the tree house could be in the same frame. For an...

That’s how you do it: Americans produce sustainably on Dutch soil

It has been busy the last months in and around Amsterdam with plenty of shooting days for two different American feature films. NL Film is co-producer of Lyrebird, about the Dutch master forger Han van Meegeren, directed by Dan Friedkin. Kaap Holland Film, previously responsible for the shooting of Nolan’s Dunkirk, now co-produces The Goldfinch by director John Crowley, based on the book by Donna Tartt and starring Nicole Kidman. At the specific request of the American producers, both productions were run as sustainable as possible! Sustainability manager on set of The Goldfinch Since the producer made sustainability in all areas an absolute requirement, Barbara Dorrestein was appointed as sustainability coordinator on the Goldfinch set. She was responsible to ensure that all the work was done sustainably every day. Room was made in the budget for her to take frequent measurements as to be able to make a detailed report of the complete cost reduction at the end of production. Even though Barbara did not have a lot of time to prepare, she still found the process of working with Americans very insightful.  She was in contact with Earth Angel beforehand, who helped her on her way to keep track of the measurements to be taken at the various departments. In terms of decor and props, for example, it was recorded which items were bought second-hand and which could be re-used. Not only the consumption on the set itself was recorded, but also of additional facilities, from hotel rooms used to the number of laundry cycles. Barbara’s favourite sustainability action though, was to bring the leftover food to different shelters where it...

Hybrid generator by Het Licht in use

Combination of sustainable lighting and efficiency is an instant hit. The True Hybrid, the hybrid generator developed by Het Licht, with an output of 28KVA, has been used on many different productions since the pilot on the set of Moordvrouw in November 2016. The sustainable generator van is easier to use, silent and more fuel efficient than regular generators. Daaf van de Veen from Het Licht is very keen to get feedback from gaffers that have used the True Hybrid, to take into consideration with further development. Users until now: Moordvrouw (gaffer: Mick Durlacher), Toon 2 (gaffer: Thomas Jeninga), Weemoedt (gaffer: Johan Hoitink), Dayan Yuragim (gaffer: Michiel Kingma), Van God Los (gaffer: Nicholas Burrough), Hollands Hoop (gaffer: Uwe Kuipers), Tarik (gaffer: Janneke Hogenboom). We asked gaffer Mick Durlacher, who was the first to use the True Hybrid on the set of Moordvrouw, about his experience. ‘It is an innovation I embrace‘, he answered immediately. The concept works. At het beginning we had some hick-ups because the lighting design for Moordvrouw had already been made and the set-up of the True Hybrid is slightly different.  But eventually he was able to save a lot of time, because the van can be parked directly on set and a lot less cabling was needed. And those cables also didn’t have to be rented and transported. But Mick is most enthusiastic about how silent it is. It makes working on set much more agreeable and efficient, plus it opens up a lot of possibilities for different locations. Shooting in the centre of Amsterdam at night without noise pollution will be much easier to arrange. It’s output is still limited, so at the moment the hybrid generator is only suitable for smaller productions. But Mick is impatiently waiting for the day the...